BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//Department of Art History - ECPv4.8.2//NONSGML v1.0//EN CALSCALE:GREGORIAN METHOD:PUBLISH X-WR-CALNAME:Department of Art History X-ORIGINAL-URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu X-WR-CALDESC:Events for Department of Art History BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191010T173000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191010T190000 DTSTAMP:20191008T200651 CREATED:20190920T122918Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190920T122955Z UID:1543-1570728600-1570734000@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Peter Sturman: "Presenting Mortality: Shen Zhou's Falling Blossoms Project" DESCRIPTION:The renowned artist Shen Zhou (1427–1509) began to explore the theme of falling blossoms as a subject for poetry\, painting\, and calligraphy in his very late years. Shen’s intention was to record his meditations on the passage of time and human mortality\, but the act of writing these verses transformed when Shen shared them with a number of prominent cultural figures in the Jiangnan region. Rhymed by admirers\, and then re-rhymed by Shen Zhou\, the poems turned into a greater project that ultimately became a highly self-conscious reflection on mortality and its presentation through art. \nThe lecture focuses on the evolution and scope of Shen Zhou’s Falling Blossoms project\, the motivations and concerns behind Shen’s activities as reflected by revealing texts\, and the manner in which Shen chose to illustrate the theme in painting. Three paintings— a fan in the Shanghai Museum and hand-scroll compositions in the Nanjing Museum and the National Palace Museum (Taipei)— demonstrate how Shen utilized a rich store of iconographical and stylistic models to establish the theme of contemplating mortality. The lecture ends with consideration of a very late composition\, Shen’s 1507 rendition of Misty River\, Layered Peaks (Liaoning Provincial Museum)\, an ambitious painting that seemingly voices a defiant resolution to some of the existential questions posed by Shen’s Falling Blossoms. \n  \n\nPeter Sturman is a professor in the Department of History of Art & Architecture at UC Santa Barbara. \nThis program is a part of the Borghesi-Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities\, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison\, with support from Nancy and David Borghesi and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/peter-sturman-presenting-mortality-shen-zhous-falling-blossoms-project/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L150\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/Shen-Zhou_Falling-Blossoms.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=UTC+0:20191016T180000 DTEND;TZID=UTC+0:20191016T193000 DTSTAMP:20191008T200651 CREATED:20190910T070515Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190913T160103Z UID:1481-1571248800-1571254200@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Anthony Cutler: "The Contagion of the Gaze: A Persistent Motif in Medieval Art and Modern Theory" DESCRIPTION:This public lecture by Prof. Anthony Cutler (emeritus\, Art History\, Penn State) will explore the artistic device in which one or more individuals depicted within an image regard us\, even while we regard it from outside. Already extant in Greek red-figure vase painting\, the motif recurs in the art of Late Antiquity\, Western Medieval and especially Islamic miniatures\, and the Renaissance. Following experiments of this sort in late nineteenth-century posters\, the heyday of the form comes in the art of the mid-twentieth century\, in Magritte’s Not to be Reproduced (1937)\, implicitly in Orson Welles’s film Citizen Kane (1941)\, and Jasper Johns’s Target with Four Faces (1965). Since there can be no question of “influence” across this huge field\, some sort of theoretical scrutiny\, emic or etic\, of this all but perennial and universal motif is called for. Even sophisticated contemporary videogames\, predicated on the aesthetics of mutual observation and the metaphysics of reciprocity\, remain unhelpful in this respect. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/anthony-cutler-the-contagion-of-the-gaze-a-persistent-motif-in-medieval-art-and-modern-theory/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L150\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/Cutler-lecture_Trier_Byz_Ivory.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=UTC+0:20191017T173000 DTEND;TZID=UTC+0:20191017T190000 DTSTAMP:20191008T200651 CREATED:20190913T161241Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191005T202711Z UID:1520-1571333400-1571338800@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Elena Boeck: "Re-Claiming The Original 'Degenerate Art': Disability\, Alterity and Byzantine Studies" DESCRIPTION:Professor Elena Boeck (History of Art\, DePaul University) will present the public lecture “Re-Claiming The Original ‘Degenerate Art’: Disability\, Alterity and Byzantine Studies” in the Chazen Auditorium within the Chazen Museum of Art. There will be a reception to follow in the Chazen Lobby. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/elena-boeck-re-claiming-the-original-degenerate-art-disability-alterity-and-byzantine-studies/ LOCATION:Chazen Museum of Art\, 750 University Ave\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/Elena-Boeck-poster-image-768x1024.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=UTC+0:20191024T170000 DTEND;TZID=UTC+0:20191024T183000 DTSTAMP:20191008T200651 CREATED:20190909T073207Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190913T160029Z UID:1473-1571936400-1571941800@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Heghnar Watenpaugh: "The Missing Pages: The Modern Life of a Medieval Manuscript from Genocide to Justice" DESCRIPTION:\nArt history\, histories of genocide\, cultural heritage\, and the questions of the continuity of the medieval and the modern intersect in the biography of a medieval Armenian Gospels manuscript. Eight of its illuminated pages were discovered in the J. Paul Getty Museum in 2010\, prompting a lawsuit. The tale of the separation of the pages from the manuscript tells a story of genocide and survival\, and makes the case for a human right to art. \nBiography:\nDr. Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh specializes in the history of art\, architecture\, and urbanism in the Middle East\, including architectural preservation\, museums\, and cultural heritage. Her first book\, The Image of an Ottoman City: Architecture in Aleppo\, was awarded the Spiro Kostof Book Prize from the Society of Architectural Historians. She has also received the Best Article Award from the Syrian Studies Association\, and the Omer Lutfi Barkan Article Prize from the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association.  Her second book\, The Missing Pages: The Modern Life of a Medieval Manuscript\, from Genocide to Justice\, was published by Stanford University Press in 2019. Her research has been supported by fellowships from the J. Paul Getty Trust\, National Endowment for the Humanities\, Fulbright-Hays\, Social Science Research Council\, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art\, and the Office of the President of the University of California. She has served on the boards of the Society of Architectural Historians\, the Syrian Studies Association\, and the Historians of Islamic Art Association\, among other professional organizations. \n\nThis event is possible thanks to the generous financial support of the UW Anonymous Fund. The Center for Visual Cultures would also like to thank the Department of Art History\, the Buildings\, Landscapes\, Cultures Program\, LACIS\, the Middle East Studies Program\, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese for their support. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/heghnar-watenpaugh-the-missing-pages-the-modern-life-of-a-medieval-manuscript-from-genocide-to-justice/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L150\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/9a008182-6d58-4b06-a797-41686d36e0d1.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=UTC+0:20191105T170000 DTEND;TZID=UTC+0:20191105T183000 DTSTAMP:20191008T200651 CREATED:20190910T065456Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190913T155341Z UID:1477-1572973200-1572978600@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Lea Stirling: "Traveling Statuettes and Traveling Aristocrats? Networks of Acquisition in the Statuary Collection at the Late Antique Villa of Séviac (France)" DESCRIPTION:The luxury décor of the Late Roman villa of Séviac (France) includes mosaics and statuary\, including heirlooms\, locally-made elements\, and imported items. Though most surviving fragments of statuary are physically small\, they provide evidence for up to ten marble statues and statuettes\, some of which originated in the East Mediterranean. Moreover\, an exceptional portrait wearing an Eastern-style toga suggests a connection to the imperial court or administration. The statuary collection at Séviac provides an opportunity to examine aristocratic networks of acquisition in Southern Gaul around A.D. 400\, a period when easy connectivity within the Mediterranean world was declining. Personal travel and networks probably account for the imported items at Séviac. \nBiography:\nDr. Lea Stirling is Professor of Classics at the University of Manitoba and held the Canada Research Chair in Roman Archaeology 2002–12. One stream of her research investigates the role of Roman and late Roman statuary in society. She is the author of the Learned Collector: Mythological Statuettes and Classical Taste in Late Antique Gaul (Ann Arbor 2005) and has published on statuary from France\, Greece\, and Tunisia. Another long-term interest is the archaeology of North Africa\, and for many years she co-directed excavations at the Roman site of Leptiminus (Lamta\, Tunisia). She is the editor (with David Stone) of Mortuary Landscapes of Tunisia (Toronto 2007). \nThis event is possible thanks to the generous financial support of the UW Anonymous Fund. The Center for Visual Cultures would also like to thank The Department of Art History\, The Buildings\, Landscapes\, Cultures Program\, and The Material Culture Program for their support. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/lea-stirling-traveling-statuettes-and-traveling-aristocrats-networks-of-acquisition-in-the-statuary-collection-at-the-late-antique-villa-of-seviac-france/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L150\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/c0258f8b-a655-4394-8a87-ea1c044064d2.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191106T173000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191106T190000 DTSTAMP:20191008T200651 CREATED:20190916T025131Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190916T025131Z UID:1535-1573061400-1573066800@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Anna Andrzejewski: "Building Paradise in a Tropical Swamp: Retirement Housing and Communities in South Florida after World War II" DESCRIPTION:This Focus on the Humanities talk explores the intersection of building and development in south Florida and the environmental movement in the second half of the twentieth century. In particular\, it focuses on the Miami-based Deltona Corporation’s efforts to transform Marco Island into a $500 million tropical paradise. Previously a seasonal fishing outpost on Florida’s southern Gulf Coast\, Deltona planned Marco to be a vacation and retirement community focused on a six mile long sandy beach. However much Deltona trilled the island’s “natural charms” to retirees and vacationers nationwide\, Marco had to be radically transformed with canals\, drainage\, and other infrastructure for Deltona’s dream to become a reality. This led to clashes with local residents and environmentalists\, who ultimately thwarted Deltona’s plans to produce a much downscaled community. \nUsing advertisements and Deltona’s private archive\, this lecture showcases a dominant trend in postwar south Florida in which developers simultaneously boasted of the tropical landscape’s natural beauty even as they irrevocably transformed it. In doing so\, it shows how developers attempted to circumvent an increasingly regulatory environment while “building paradise” in the American sunbelt. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/anna-andrzejewski-building-paradise-in-a-tropical-swamp-retirement-housing-and-communities-in-south-florida-after-world-war-ii/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L140\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/Andrzejewski4.jpeg END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR